Day One At Joshua Tree National Park

3 04 2011

[This and a number of future posts were written during our stay in Joshua Tree National Park. They’ll come out over the next few days and will eventually catch up with real life, which has us staying by a local non-English-speaking family in a tiny 98% Latino / Mexican city. More to come on that.]

Written on Tuesday, March 29th (the first post from Joshua Tree)

After a couple of hours of last-minute interneting we headed into Joshua Tree National Park in the late afternoon on Monday. To our surprise there were no spots available at the first few (first-come-first-serve) campgrounds that we checked out, even though there were over 100 sites at each one.

Entering Joshua Tree National Park

Entering Joshua Tree National Park

A bit dejected, we were prepared to head back to Twentynine Palms for the night when we decided to check out one last small campground. Full.

Ayo wouldn’t take that “full” for an answer, however, and saved the day by convincing a friendly camper to let us share her large site overnight.

Sunset From Our Site

Sunset From Our Site

Gorgeous Colors

Gorgeous Colors

We spent the evening appropriately watching part of a Ken Burns’ documentary on the National Parks system. We stayed up late enough to enjoy the night sky and awakened early enough (only me) to watch the Moon, Venus, and Sun rising from bed through our large overcab window.

Tuesday morning gave us a nice stroke of luck. We needed to find a new spot, so I walked around our campground to look for a vacant site. Having grown to really enjoy the quiet and spacious Belle campground, it was fortuitous that as I was walking around, a large Class A RV was pulling out of one of the most spacious spots. I quickly ran back to the RV and a 30-second drive later we were in our site.

Us At Keys View, Overlooking The San Andreas Fault

Us At Keys View, Overlooking The San Andreas Fault

Unless You Are A Cactus Wren...

Unless You Are A Cactus Wren...

Joshua Tree is awesome. The terrain is beautiful, the Joshua Trees are weird as anything, and the boulders and rock formations are stunning. There’s a ton to explore, and we’ve found it easy to hitch rides to various sites, saving us from taking the RV around the park each day.

One Of The Benefits Of RVing In A National Park: Real Food

One Of The Benefits Of RVing In A National Park: Real Food

Endless Joshua Tree "Forest"

Endless Joshua Tree "Forest"

This place is sweet, and it’s wonderful to be back in real nature.

Yair In Front Of A Boulder Pile

Yair In Front Of A Boulder Pile

posted by yair

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4 responses

3 04 2011
Glenn

What’s that real food? It looks mighty good.

3 04 2011
jayhorowitz

Sorry, man – it’s meatless. Caramelized onions with garlic and pepper sauteed portobello mushrooms. Tasty, but beef-free.

3 04 2011
Glenn

Harsh. So how exactly does being in a national park facilitate this sort of eating?

3 04 2011
jayhorowitz

We can of course eat like that anywhere, but I meant it more as a contrast to the tenting folks around us eating “add two cups of water” meals.

Gotta be tough, don’t you 🙂

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